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    Printing euro sign without making the print into a picture

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  • Petter Stjernkvist Petter Stjernkvist
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    We had a problem getting the Euro character printed, using Arial font on a Streamserve Persuasion server. As I recall we had the same problem both in PageOut and using text in tables containing the €.

    Rasterization of the invoice to a picture solved the problem. But instead made the print extremely slow. In particular the double sided A3:s with a lot of text have this problem.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Best Answer
    Camilla Gyllström Camilla Gyllström Administrator StreamServe Employee
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    When we changed the codepage on the out connector from ISO8859-1 to cp1252-WinLatin1 everything is printed as expected.

    C.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Stefan Cohen Stefan Cohen StreamServe Employee Administrator
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    What driver are you using?

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Petter Stjernkvist Petter Stjernkvist
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    A modified PCL6.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Vyv Lomax Vyv Lomax Administrator
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    Can you please identify how it is arriving in your input data? Is it showing correctly when you look at the file? (In UltraEdit or similar) is it hex 80?

    Have you tried opening up the codepage to say ISO 8859-15? What codepage are you using now?

    Have you printed a test file from say notepad with the € sign in it to prove that the font in the printer has the sign too? (This is not a failsafe way to determine this as it depends upon your application a little bit).

    Just to really confuse things for you - I am posting a link here to a similar previous issue.

    Yeah - not helping I know....

    You may have to filter it with a file filter in order for it to show. If you can edit your resulting pcl file so that it prints the euro sign then you know what you have to filter your input into. This may involve some trial and error.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Vyv Lomax Vyv Lomax Administrator
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    Does it work when you print to PDF file?

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Petter Stjernkvist Petter Stjernkvist
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    Thanks for the help. I might not have been very clear when I started the topic, sorry.

    1. It isn't arriving in the input data at all. It is text in tables such as the language file or labels in the PageOut.

    2. The input data is just in 8859-1, but that can't be relevant here, since the sign isn't in the file. The language file for instance, is UTF-8.

    3. That works. Using same font, same server, same printer.

    4. I've looked at that thread, but don't know if that is relevant when the character isn't coming from the indata.

    5. Same here, is this something applicable to my problem?

    6. PDF works fine.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Vyv Lomax Vyv Lomax Administrator
    0 likes

    So to summarise: You have the € sign in your Lables and SLS files and it prints out OK in PDF but not on the printer?

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Vyv Lomax Vyv Lomax Administrator
    0 likes

    Does the € sign come out on paper when you print the PDF?

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Camilla Gyllström Camilla Gyllström Administrator StreamServe Employee
    0 likes

    When we changed the codepage on the out connector from ISO8859-1 to cp1252-WinLatin1 everything is printed as expected.

    C.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010
  • Stefan Cohen Stefan Cohen StreamServe Employee Administrator
    2 likes

    ISO 8859-1 doesn't support the euro sign. You need something like ISO 8859-15 or WinLatin1 for that. From Wikipedia:

    Relationship to ISO/IEC 8859-15

    Although ISO/IEC 8859-1 has enough characters for most French text, it is missing a few letters that are less common. It is also missing a single-glyph representation for the letter IJ, two Finnish letters used for transcription of some foreign names and in a few loanwords (Š and Ž), typographic quotation marks and dashes, and common symbols such as the euro sign (€) and dagger (†).

    In order to provide some of these characters, ISO/IEC 8859-15 was developed as an update of ISO/IEC 8859-1. This required, however, the removal of some infrequently-used characters from ISO/IEC 8859-1, including fraction symbols and letter-free diacritics: ¤, ¦, ¨, ´, ¸, ¼, ½, and ¾.

    Wednesday 28 April, 2010

 

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